General Information

Who are we?

We are a society run by members, for members. We are all friends who share the same interest in astronomy.

At our monthly meetings we have either an internal presentation given by a member, or a talk from a visiting speaker, on a wide range of astronomy related subjects.

 

 There is also an opportunity, weather permitting, for regular observing sessions using dark sites around the area including our own observatory which houses a 16” telescope.

 

It is not essential to own your own telescope or binoculars as the Society has its own and a number of smaller telescopes available for loan to members.  Also many members have equipment they are willing to share at viewing sessions.

 

ESAS also has an extensive library of over 150 books available to loan to its members.

 

 

How can we help?

 

As an astronomical society we are not only interested in furthering our own knowledge, but making new friends and giving local schools and societies the opportunities that were not available to us as at their age.

 

We have interest from schools and youth groups all over the county requesting us to go and give talks. Talks to youth groups, for example Cubs and Scouts, are particularly useful as they help towards gaining certain proficiency badges.

 

 

Do I have to know about Astronomy?

 

No. Many of our members have only a basic knowledge of astronomy and we have an age range from10 to 90, so our friendly monthly meetings are geared to those levels of knowledge. Our aim is to learn more on the subject and the desire to pass on experience to others.

 

 

Society magazine

 

Our monthly newsletter, free to members, is called Albedo, (an astronomical term for the measure of reflectivity or brightness of a material or body). It contains articles about Society activities, interesting features about astronomy and a chart showing what can be seen in the night sky for the coming month.

  

ESAS Honorary President

Without doubt Sir Patrick Moore has done more to popularise the science of astronomy than anyone else alive. To the public it was his first appearance on television as presenter of the the Sky at Night on 26th April 1957 at 10:30 pm. that launched him into the media spot light, a place he had held ever since. He has presented the Sky at Night continuously only missing one show in July 2004 when struck down by food poisoning. One of the Society's founders, Andy Lawes, has known Sir Patrick for many years and Sir Patrick was the obvious choice in 2000 to be asked if he would assist in the formation of the Society by becoming its Honorary President. Without hesitation Sir Patrick accepted and he has been our Honorary President ever since.  To find out more about Sir Patrick click here.

 

Charity status

 

ESAS is a registered charity (UK Registered Charity No. 1110848). 

Publications, Books and Scopes

Publications 

ESAS Star Atlas

The ESAS Star Atlas has been written by ESAS members Roy Bicknell and Andy Lawes.  This atlas has been produced in the hope that it will be useful to the beginner amateur astronomer and well as the more experienced practitioner. Its use will best be for identifying the major constellations and stars to 6th magnitude, while observers with binoculars or small telescopes will be able to home in onto the deep sky objects listed in Messier’s famous catalogue and Patrick Moore’s Caldwell Catalogue. The tables on the last page will help in identifying the brighter planets, unfortunately, Mercury's fast movement does not permit monthly tabulation.

Copies of the Star Atlas cost £5

 

ESAS Library

Due to the changing face of Astronomy on a daily basis, and the use of the Internet to look for current information, books become obsolete very quickly, ESAS is no longer holding a library.

Scopes and other equipment

 An inventory of equipment held by the Society is listed below and those that can be loaned out to members as indicated.

 The inventory list will follow shortly
 

This atlas has been produced in the hope that it will be useful to the beginner amateur astronomer and well as the more experienced practitioner. Its use will best be for identifying the major constellations and stars, while observers with binoculars or small telescopes will be able to home in onto the deep sky objects listed in Messier’s famous catalogue and Patrick Moore’s Caldwell Catalogue. The tables on the last page will help in identifying the brighter planets, unfortunately, Mercury's fast movement does not permit monthly tabulation.